Topics: racism

Topics: racism

“The Times, They Are A-Changin'”

February 2, 2020

Rev. Dr. Michelle Walsh was the guest preacher at First Church Unitarian in Littleton, Massachusetts on February 2, 2020. Her sermon was “The Times, They Are A-Changin'”. Rev. Dr. Walsh, LICSW, is a Unitarian Universalist community minister and shares a private justice consulting and spiritual coaching practice known as Tuckerman Creative Ministries for Justice and Healing with her husband, Rev. Dr. Clyde Grubbs. She also has worked as a scholar activist for many years in urban contexts, teaches as a lecturer at Boston University, and is the author of Violent Trauma, Culture and Power: An Interdisciplinary Exploration in Lived Religion as well as chapters in other volumes.

“Tisquanta’s Gift”

December 1, 2019

The guest preacher at First Church Unitarian in Littleton, Massachusetts on December 1, 2019 was the Rev. Dr. Clyde Grubbs. Rev. Dr. Grubbs’s sermon was “Tisquanta’s Gift”. Description: “According to written sources, an American Indian came among the settlers in the Plymouth Plantation soon after arrival and taught them essential knowledge that was key to their survival. Who was this mystery man whom the English speaking Pilgrims called Squanto?” The Rev. Dr. Clyde Grubbs is a Unitarian Universalist minister who served congregations in Indiana, Quebec, Massachusetts, Texas, Florida, and California. He is presently serving as Minister at Large of the Tuckerman Creative Ministries for Justice and Healing. Clyde honors his Native American heritage (Texas Cherokee) which informs his spiritual understanding and practice, and his anti-racist and anti-oppressive commitment. He has worked for peace, justice, and equality since he was in the Unitarian Universalist youth movement, Liberal Religious Youth.

“This Makes Me Uncomfortable: White Fragility”

October 20, 2019

The FCU delegates for last year’s UU General Assembly (i.e., the offsite delegates and I) all learned a lot from a workshop on the topic of “white fragility” co-presented by Robin DiAngelo (author of “White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism”) and Aisha Hauser, a UU religious educator. Why is it so often unsettling for white people to talk about race?